About Us

Contact Us

Partner With Us

Careers
Copyright 2016, and all prior years, zoomhealth.net, all rights reserved.
Privacy Policy

Disclaimer


Sudden Cardiac Arrest and Diabetes --- A Deadly Connection

Related Links

Diabetes and High Blood Pressure - What Should You Eat?

Blood Thinning Medications - Foods Not to Mix

 Ibuprofen Overdose -Top 10 Symptoms and Remedies

Artery Spasms - Top 5 Natural Remedies

Prinzmetal's Angina - Causes and Top 7 Natural Remedies

Polypharmacy - When You Take Too Many Medications

Ritalin Side Effects - Top 7 Natural Remedies

Eat Sugar, Age Faster

Aging in Reverse -How to Lower Your Chronological Age

Paleo Diet -Healthy or Hoax?

Why Are My Upper Arms So Fat?-Scientists Have the Answer

7 Foods Men Should Eat to Control with High Blood Pressure

Staying Upbeat Can Cut Your Heart Attack by 33%

What Your Fingernails Say About Your Health

Why Are My Hands Tingling-Causes and Top 10 Natural Remedies

Taking Aim at Stroke - 7 Surprising Prevention Tips

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 31, 2016

By SUSAN CALLAHAN, Associate Editor and Featured Columnist

 








It was a normal Sunday like thousands of other Sundays in 62 year old Harriet Johnson's life. Earlier that day, the petite mother of two and grandmother of three had risen early to go to church with Bill, her husband of 45 years.  Later, she had driven her two oldest grandsons, now teenagers and each a full head taller than she, back to her home to spend the rest of the day, as was their tradition. She could never do enough for her grandkids, she thought almost every day.

Around 6:30PM that evening, got a call from her cousin Jamie Lynn, also 62. They always ended the call with a check on each other's health, sort of taking inventory. "How you feeling?", Jamie Lynn asked. "Fine, as long as I don't have a heart attack, I've got no complaints.", Harriet replied.

Two hours later, at 8:30PM, Harriet was sitting in her chair talking with her husband Bill, the TV was playing some movie that was more a background lull than riveting, when she announced, "you know, I'm not feeling well, I think I'll go take a nap". Harriet rose from her chair, took three steps toward her bedroom and collapsed.  By the time Bill scooped her tiny frame up into his arms to put her on the couch, she was already dead. 

Harriet, a diabetic of 20 years, had died of sudden cardiac arrest.

Harriet's death, a true story, mirrors a sobering statistic. Diabetics are far more likely to die of a sudden heart attack as people who do not have diabetes. How much more likely?

Diabetes Predicts Your Risk for Sudden Cardiac Arrest

People who do not have any indication of heart disease only have a 0.82 out of 1000 patient-years chance of dying suddenly from cardiac arrest, a study has found. People with diabetes, however, who also have some indication of a heart problem have a 13.82 chance for every 1000 patient-years of suddenly dropping dead.

That means that they are 17 times more likely to drop dead of heart attack than healthy people. 

These statistics are from a 2004 study on so-called "out-of-hospital" cardiac attacks conducted by the Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Seattle, Washington.

This was a major study which looked at 1,275 episodes of cardiac arrest in a large population 675,910 patient-years from 1986 to 1994. The study's participants ranged in age from 50 to 79 years old.

Why Diabetics Are More Likely to Drop Dead from Heart Attacks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sudden deaths from cardiac arrest happen so often to diabetics because diabetics suffer more from plaque build up in their arteries, a condition known as arteriosclerosis, according to a 2010 study led by Dr. David Siscovick of the University of Washington, Cardiovascular Health Research Unit.

Two more reasons also account for the high rate of heart attacks in diabetics. Diabetics often have muscular heart pumping dysfunction. Diabetes damages the heart muscle.

Diabetics either have what Dr. Siscovick's team calls " "patchy areas of myocardial fibrosis" which causes impairment in the left ventricular of their hearts filling (diastolic dysfunction) and/or "left ventricle systolic heart failure. "   You'll recognize the terms systolic and diastolic ---they are the top and bottom numbers, respectively, of your blood pressure numbers.

As for the "patchy areas of myocardial fibrosis", these are what they sound like, scarring or rough collagen tissue. These rough patches or thickening develop over time and are present in all cases of heart failure.

The third reason that diabetics die from heart attacks is that diabetes disrupts the way that electrical signals communicate through your heart tissue. If you imagine electrical wiring built behind and through a smooth sheetrock wall that is suddenly flooded and becomes cracked and warped. The cracked and warped walls will disrupt the smooth flow of electricity in and through the wall.

How High Must Your Blood Sugar Levels Be to Increase Your Risk of Heart Attack?

Diabetes in the study was defined as having a blood sugar level above 7.7 mmol/L . That's about 140 mg/dL.  But even those with borderline diabetes  face an increased risk of cardiac attack.

 

This means that you should always stay as close to normal or ideal fasting blood sugar levels as you can to steer clear of elevated cardiac risk. Normal blood sugar levels range between 4.56 and 6.38 mmol/L or between 82 and 115 g/L two hours after eating, in line with the stringent standards followed in some European countries.

In the US, standards for diagnosing "diabetes" are different. Normal fasting (before eating blood sugar) ranges between and 70 and 99 mg/dL and lower than 140 within 2 hours of eating.

The American Diabetes Association says your blood sugar level can range up to 180 mg/dL two hours after eating. Before eating in the morning, it should range from 80 to 130 mg/dL, they say.

 

So, let's say you wake up in the morning and eat your breakfast. Two hours later you take your blood sugar levels and it is 150 mg/dL. You are more than 50% higher than the upper range of normal in some European countries.  But you are safely within "normal" in the US.

The safest course is to follow the tougher standards. It could save your heart.

 

 

 

 

 

It was a normal Sunday like thousands of other Sundays in 62 year old Harriet Johnson's life. Earlier that day, the petite mother of two and grandmother of three had risen early to go to church with Bill, her husband of 45 years.  Later, she had driven her two oldest grandsons, now teenagers and each a full head taller than she, back to her home to spend the rest of the day, as was their tradition. She could never do enough for her grandkids, she thought almost every day.

Around 6:30PM that evening, got a call from her cousin Jamie Lynn, also 62. They always ended the call with a check on each other's health, sort of taking inventory. "How you feeling?", Jamie Lynn asked. "Fine, as long as I don't have a heart attack, I've got no complaints.", Harriet replied.

Two hours later, at 8:30PM, Harriet was sitting in her chair talking with her husband Bill, the TV was playing some movie that was more a background lull than riveting, when she announced, "you know, I'm not feeling well, I think I'll go take a nap". Harriet rose from her chair, took three steps toward her bedroom and collapsed.  By the time Bill scooped her tiny frame up into his arms to put her on the couch, she was already dead. 

Harriet, a diabetic of 20 years, had died of sudden cardiac arrest.

Harriet's death, a true story, mirrors a sobering statistic. Diabetics are [twice] as likely to die of a sudden heart attack as people who do not have diabetes.

Diabetes Predicts Your Risk for Sudden Cardiac Arrest

People who do not have any indication of heart disease only have a 0.82 out of 1000 patient-years chance of dying suddenly from cardiac arrest, a study has found. People with diabetes, however, who also have some indication of a heart problem have a 13.82 chance of suddenly dropping dead. That means that they are 17 times more likely to drop dead of heart attack than healthy people.
 

 

Related:

Age in Reverse -How to Lower Your Chronological Age

How to Lower the Amount of Toxins in Your Blood

Paleo Diet -Healthy or Hoax

7 Foods Men with High Blood Pressure Should Eat

High Blood Pressure and Diabetes Diet

What Your Fingernails Say About Your Health

 

 

 

 

 


Increase your health IQ.
Subscribe in a reader

Subscribe to Zoomhealth -Today's Health News


Home > Diets > You Are Here



zoomHealth